Scottish Girdle Scones aka Griddle Scones

This is a traditional Scottish recipe passed down through my Great Aunt. I can’t think of a better way to start the morning than with one of these scones and a cup of tea. My dad makes these occasionally and they always disappear almost as fast as he can make them. They come out a bit differently than scones you bake in the oven. They are somewhere in between a baked scone and a pancake as far as texture and taste are concerned. You can eat them on their own, because they’re that tasty, or you can add a little butter and jam if you like.

I decided to try to vegan-ize the recipe since I missed having these. It came out quite well and I don’t think this recipe is too far off from the original. I bet my Great Aunt never imagined there’d be a vegan version of her recipe, but I bet she’d be happy we were still making these!¬†If you want to check out the original recipe handwritten by my Great Aunt, check out my Dad’s blog about his experiences growing up in Scotland and his book “Roses of Winter”. It’s neat to see a little piece of history.

I apologize for the less than amazing photos. I only had my camera phone with me, but I wanted you to get a sense of what they should look like.

Ingredients:

3 2/3 cups self-rising flour
1/2-teaspoon salt
1/4-teaspoon baking soda
1/4-teaspoon cream of tartar
1/4 cup Earth Balance vegan butter
1/3 cup sugar
1 Tbsp EnerG Egg Replacer Powder
4 Tbsp water
1 cup of soy milk

I converted all the measurements for you, but if you ever need help converting measurements using a British recipe and you don’t have a cooking scale, this is a helpful site.

Directions:

  • Mix the flour, salt, baking soda, and cream of tartar.
  • Rub in the vegan butter. I use my hands to combine it with the flour mixture.
  • In a separate bowl, beat the egg replacer powder with the water until well combined. Then add the soy milk in. Add the liquids into the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon until flour is absorbed and makes a firm dough. Mine came out a little sticky, but the scones still turned out well. Don’t over mix!
  • Place a large handful of the dough onto a well-floured surface, enough at a time to make a round. Roll out the dough to a thickness of about a 1/4-inch and cut into 4 quarters. I actually sprinkled a little flour on the dough and patted it down. That worked better than rolling since the dough was a little sticky.
  • Bake the scones on a griddle on medium heat. Finding the right temperature in your particular set up will take some practice. When the scones are brown on one side turn them over and brown the other side.

Important:¬†Handle the dough as little as possible. As my Great Aunt notes, if you handle it too much “you could sole your shoes” with them! They should be light and fluffy with a slightly crispy outside.